Researchers confirm site of Salem hangings – The Boston Globe

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Salem’s witch trials were a memory by the time artist Thomas Satterwhite Noble painted “The Salem Martyr” in 1869. He portrays a young girl found guilty of witchcraft walking to the gallows with the hangman and her stern judges.
Salem’s witch trials were a memory by the time artist Thomas Satterwhite Noble painted “The Salem Martyr” in 1869. He portrays a young girl found guilty of witchcraft walking to the gallows with the hangman and her stern judges.

By Laura Crimaldi GLOBE STAFF JANUARY 13, 2016
SALEM — The wooded spot overlooking Walgreens on Boston Street is unremarkable. The rocky ledge of knotted trees is surrounded by houses, and the path to the top is unpaved.

But the days of anonymity for the site known as Proctor’s Ledge are over. Researchers announced this week they have confirmed the plot is where 19 people accused of witchcraft were hanged in a wave of hysteria that swept this seaside city in 1692.
Salem plans to mark the ignominious spot, Mayor Kimberley Driscoll said. The memorial is expected to be modest, the mayor said, given the lack of easy access or parking at the site.

Still, Driscoll said: “This is part of our history, and this is an opportunity for us to be honest about what took place.”

Source: Researchers confirm site of Salem hangings – The Boston Globe

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