Weekly Digest #12: How to Make Standardized Testing Better — The Learning Scientists

Last week, we published a digest of divergent views on standardized testing. Realistically, though, you’re unlikely to be reading our blog if you’re truly dead set against any kind of standardized testing – and in fact, let’s not forget the important point that any kind of test is actually standardized.

So let’s take as a basic assumption the idea that we do need some form of standardized assessment in order to determine whether schools are doing their jobs and students are learning. Given this assumption, how can we improve the process? Luckily, in the past few weeks, a few great blog posts have sprung up to address this very issue.

Image from linked source

 

In this short post, the infamous teacher-turned-columnist David describes what he would do if he was the testing czar, in 5 simple steps. Briefly, he says he would select a small sample of students at the beginning of the year, and another small sample at the end, and only test them.

 

via Weekly Digest #12: How to Make Standardized Testing Better — The Learning Scientists

Could our ancestors see blue? Ancient people didn’t perceive the colour because they didn’t have a word for it, say scientists | Daily Mail Online

Could our ancestors see blue? Ancient people didn’t perceive the colour because they didn’t have a word for it, say scientists
Studies say language shapes what we see by making us focus on objects
Blue doesn’t appear at all in Greek stories and other ancient written texts
As a result, scientists believe ancient civilisations didn’t notice the colour
Egyptians – who were the only culture that could produce blue dyes – were the first civilisation to have a word for the colour blue in 2500 BC
The Himba people in Namibia do not have a word for blue and tests have shown they have difficulty distinguishing between green and blue
By ELLIE ZOLFAGHARIFARD FOR DAILYMAIL.COM

PUBLISHED: 18:00 EST, 2 March 2015 | UPDATED: 21:01 EST, 2 March 2015

via Could our ancestors see blue? Ancient people didn’t perceive the colour because they didn’t have a word for it, say scientists | Daily Mail Online

Watch: False Killer Whales Hunt Down a Shark

A high-speed chase off the coast of Australia claimed the life of a juvenile shark after it was hunted and eaten by a group of false killer whales.

Video of the hunt was captured by photographer Bruno Kataoka and broadcast on local TV station 7 News Sydney. The hunt went down off the coast of Cronulla, a suburb of Sydney. Kataoka spotted the whales chasing their prey while flying a drone with an camera attached, and he followed the hunt until a whale lunged from below and captured the sha …read more

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